Advocacy Track

To view PPTicon-web  PowerPoint presentations click here.

To learn more about individual breakout sessions click on the title name (updated 3-25-16):

Tuesday
Insights from the Field on State Policy, Insurer and Health System Levers to Curb Rx Drug Overdose
State Responses to Rx Drug and Heroin Abuse
Physicians Engaged in Prevention
 
Wednesday
The Naked Truth about Medical Marijuana
Advocating for Change
Activating Your Community

Overview
Drug overdose deaths are the leading cause of injury death in the United States, ahead of deaths from motor vehicle accidents and firearms, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s 2015 National Drug Threat Assessment. In 2013, the most recent year for which data is available, 46,471 people in the U.S. died from a drug overdose, and more than half of those were caused by Rx painkillers and heroin. According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc., (NCADD), drug abuse costs employers $81 billion annually, proving the devastation is both personal and societal. To fight this epidemic, advocates influence laws and policies to reduce Rx drug and heroin abuse. The Advocacy Track will consider which changes are being advocated and how this is occurring at the local, state and federal levels. Topics will include recommendations for which laws and policies to change, lessons learned by jurisdictions that have tried new laws and policies, best practices for advocates and advocacy coalitions, and engaging stakeholders, such as elected officials, law enforcement, medical professionals, pharmacists and persons in recovery.
Insights from the Field on State Policy, Insurer and Health System Levers to Curb Rx Drug Overdose
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 11:15 am to 12:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | ADA | APA | NASW | NAADAC | NCHES | NBCC| AAFP
Presenters G. Caleb Alexander, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
 
Janette Baird, PhD
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Brown University
 
Gerald “Jerry” Cochran, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work University of Pittsburgh
 
Daniel Hartung, PharmD, MPH
Associate Professor, Oregon State University College of Pharmacy
 
Joseph Hsu, MD
Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon, Carolinas Medical Center
 
Rachel Seymour
Senior Scientist, Carolinas Medical Center
Moderator http://nationalrxdrugabusesummit.org/biographies/jan-losby/
Behavioral Scientist, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Session Description The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) advances system-level interventions that help prevent people from becoming dependent on, abusing and potentially overdosing on Rx opioid pain relievers. Researchers representing five CDC-funded extramural research projects will share their results and discuss implications for opioid prescribing, dispensing and utilization. They will highlight their work in three areas: state policy, insurer mechanisms and health system interventions. Specifically, researchers will report on the impact of state Medicaid-related policies and state pill mill laws to change prescribing behavior, decrease inappropriate use of opioids and improve patient outcomes. They will share how interventions related to adding an alert to an electronic health record and modifying patient-staff interactions promote judicious opioid prescribing while reducing opioid-related abuse, misuse and overdose. This body of research can assist in identifying effective evidence-based practices that state health departments, insurers, pharmacy benefit managers and health care systems can implement.
Learning Objectives 1. Evaluate the impact of state Medicaid-related policies and state pill mill laws on prescribing behavior, inappropriate use of opioids and patient outcomes.
2. Explain interventions that promote judicious opioid prescribing and reduce opioid-related abuse, misuse and overdose.
3. Identify effective evidence-based practices for state health departments, insurers, pharmacy benefit managers and health care systems.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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State Responses to Rx Drug and Heroin Abuse
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 4:15 pm to 5:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | ADA | APA | NASW | NAADAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP
Presenters Michael Landen, MD, MPH
State Epidemiologist, New Mexico Department of Health
 
Ralph Orr
Director, Virginia Prescription Monitoring Program, Virginia Department of Health Professions
 
Maggie Hart Stebbins
County Commissioner, Bernalillo (NM) Board of Commissioners
 
Dean Wright, RPh
PMP Director, Arizona State Board of Pharmacy
Moderator Mark D. Birdwhistell, MPA
Vice President for Administration and External Affairs, University of Kentucky HealthCare
Session Description Every day in the United States, 44 people die from Rx drug overdoses. Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths nearly quadrupled. Seeking to reverse these alarming trends, states are employing multi-disciplinary data and research-driven strategies to address the complex nature of the opioid epidemic. This session will examine three states’ responses to Rx drug and heroin abuse.

To begin, presenters will discuss recommendations of the Virginia Governor’s Task Force on Prescription Drug and Heroin Abuse and the Arizona Prescription Drug Reduction Initiative. They will describe Virginia’s new Health and Criminal Justice Data Committee designed to help the commonwealth respond to concerns before they become crises. Additionally, they will outline Arizona’s innovative state-wide prescriber report cards using the Rx drug monitoring program (PDMP) as a data feedback system for prescribers to self-monitor their prescribing practices.

Next, presenters will describe New Mexico’s model for stakeholder collaboration to reduce opioid overdose deaths, which began in 2012 and includes the state’s Congressional delegation, Governor’s Council for Prescription Drug Misuse, the Board of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Pain Center, U.S. Attorney, Bernalillo County Commissioner and Healing Addiction in the Community. Topics will include the nature of the state’s epidemic, PDMP, naloxone initiatives, continuing medical education for all prescribers, licensing board regulation of prescribing, anti-drug diversion and trafficking efforts, Project HOPE, and parent advocacy regarding adolescent addiction treatment resources.

Learning Objectives 1. Outline how Virginia’s new Health and Criminal Justice Data Committee is designed to respond to concerns before they become crises.
2. Explain Arizona’s state-wide prescriber report cards.
3. Describe New Mexico’s model for stakeholder collaboration to reduce opioid overdose deaths.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Physicians Engaged in Prevention
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | APA | NASW | NADAAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP
Presenters Angela Conover
Director, Media and Community Relations, Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey
 
Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc.
 
Daniel Raymond
Policy Director, Harm Reduction Coalition
Moderator Daniel Blaney-Koen
Senior Legislative Attorney, American Medical Association Advocacy Resource Center, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description Physicians wield great power to address the U.S. Rx drug abuse epidemic. This session will feature policy solutions supported by the medical community and a state program that engages medical professionals in prevention.

Representatives of organized medicine and the harm reduction community will highlight how policies supporting prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and naloxone access can work together to reduce abuse and save lives. Presenters will explain why the medical and harm reduction communities embrace these three key public policy approaches to ending America’s opioid crisis. They will explain how the policies can be coordinated to identify patients who may need increased care coordination for treating pain, opportunities to ensure treatment for a substance use disorder, and clinical indications for the co-prescribing of naloxone to the patient or a family member or friend.

Next, attendees will learn how to duplicate the results of New Jersey’s Do No Harm symposium series, which engages physicians in Rx drug abuse prevention. Ninety percent of prescribers who attended a Do No Harm symposium reported they would make opioid prescribing changes or apply learnings to their practice as a result of attending the symposium and changes in Rx abuse-related state legislation. The presenter will explain how the series educates physicians and the medical community on the epidemic of Rx drug abuse and on the link between medication and heroin abuse, as well as engages them in prevention efforts. Best practices will be covered.

Learning Objectives 1. Specify roles for physicians and medical professionals in responding to the nation’s Rx drug abuse epidemic.
2. Explain how policies supporting PDMP, MAT and naloxone access can work together to reduce opioid abuse.
3. Describe a state program that educates physicians about Rx drug abuse and its link to heroin abuse and engages them in prevention efforts.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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The Naked Truth about Medical Marijuana
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm
CE certified GA Bar | GA POST
Presenters Thomas J. Gorman
Director, Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area
 
Susan R. Thau, MCRP
Public Policy Consultant, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
Moderator Nancy Hale, MA
President and CEO, Operation UNITE
Session Description In an update to what was a standing room only session at the 2015 Rx Summit, CADCA’s Sue Thau will discuss the naked truth about marijuana, medical marijuana and legalization. Rocky Mountain HIDTA Director Tom Gorman will provide an insider’s look based on his research and on-the ground experience in Colorado. Retail and “medical” cannabis has major implications for sectors such as law enforcement, substance abuse prevention and treatment, the judicial system, education, employers, parents and youth. They will discuss the best approaches to use in addressing this increasingly challenging issue. Participants will gain a better understanding of the impact of marijuana use on the adolescent brain; how to use data to track the actual impacts of medical marijuana and marijuana legalization on public health and public safety; and learn how to deliver science-based messages that resonate with the general public.
Learning Objectives 1. Identify concerns related to marijuana, medical marijuana and legalization.
2. Evaluate the impact of marijuana legalization in Colorado.
3. Describe the impact of marijuana use on the adolescent brain.
4. Explain how to track the impact of medical marijuana and marijuana legalization on public health and safety.
5. Prepare attendees to deliver science-based messages that resonate with the general public.
6. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Advocating for Change
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | ADA | APA | NASW | NADAAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP | GA Bar
Presenters Kim Manlove, MS, AB
Director, Indiana Addictions Issues Coalition
 
Gary Mendell, MBA
Founder and CEO, Shatterproof
Moderator Wendy Spencer
Chief Executive Officer, Corporation for National and Community Service
Session Description Some of the most powerful voices for changing laws, policies and perceptions related to Rx drug and heroin abuse are lifted by individuals — especially when they tell personal stories about their own or their loved one’s addiction. This session will demonstrate how to lobby for legislative change, based on the successful techniques of a parent who became an advocate, and how to empower people who are in recovery from addiction to become advocates.

To begin, the CEO of Shatterproof — a national organization that he founded after his son Brian lost his battle with addiction in 2011 — will describe how it launched advocacy campaigns in 2014 in Connecticut, Florida, Kentucky and West Virginia to influence passage of legislation that would reduce the number of deaths related to overdose of opiates. The campaign included retaining local lobbyists and public affair firms, bringing together over 40 local advocacy organizations, and giving personal testimony. In 2015, all four states passed legislation related to Good Samaritan and naloxone access, and Connecticut mandated usage of its PMDP and prescriber education. In 2016, Shatterproof will focus its legislative efforts on mandating use of a state PDMPs. The presenter will outline model legislation, strategies to influence passage of legislation and a blueprint for other organizations to impact their states.

The next presenter will focus on tapping the advocate potential of people in recovery from addiction. The Indiana Addictions Issues Coalition offers the groundbreaking recovery messaging training developed by Faces & Voices of Recovery. The training helps people in recovery sharpen their skills as recovery communicators and learn how to tell their story with a purpose. Participants can become recovery communicators by learning about messaging, how to tell your recovery story to friends and family, and how to use recovery messages in all parts of their lives, including representing the organized recovery community in the media and other public places.

Learning Objectives 1. Advocate for state laws that mandate usage of state PDMPs.
2. Explain strategies to influence passage of legislation.
3. Describe how people in recovery from addiction can become advocates through recovery messaging training.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Activating Your Community
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | APA | NASW | NADAAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP
Presenters Catherine Thatcher Brunson, MS
Trainer/Consultant, National Coalition Institute, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
 
Kasey Dean
Strategic Prevention Tribal Liaison, Absentee Shawnee Tribe
 
Mary Elizabeth Elliott
Vice President, Communications, Membership and IT, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
 
Miranda Willis
Strategic Prevention Data Analyst, Chickasaw Nation
Moderator Karen H. Perry
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Narcotics Overdose Prevention and Education Task Force, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description To effectively reduce Rx drug abuse, it is imperative that communities employ a full range of techniques that target and engage every sector of the community from healthcare to law enforcement. This session will demonstrate two models for activating your community: the Seven Strategies for Community Change by CADCA and the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA).

To begin, CADCA representatives will identify best practices by coalitions that are employing all seven behavior change strategies. They will feature case studies of coalitions that have implemented a broad array of approaches aimed at changing or influencing community conditions, standards and regulations, and institutions and policies. They will analyze several unique challenges related to Rx drug abuse and identify innovative solutions. Attendees will gain understanding of strategies to implement at home to improve outcomes.

Next, presenters will explain how tribal communities can partner and share resources to reduce Rx drug abuse/misuse. Native American communities suffer from disproportionately high substance abuse issues, and they have limited access to community-level data and evidence-based prevention programs. The Absentee Shawnee Tribe and the Chickasaw Nation, as part of the Oklahoma Inter-Tribal Consortium, are using the SPF to build and implement programs that are evidence-based, culturally appropriate and sustainable. Topics will include training first responders to use naloxone, educational and media campaigns, and a safe storage and disposal program.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify best practices by coalitions to implement CADCA’s Seven Strategies for Community Change.
2. Outline the unique challenges to Rx drug abuse/misuse advocacy faced by Native American communities.
3. Describe how tribal communities can use the SPF to build and implement evidence-based, culturally appropriate and sustainable substance abuse prevention programs.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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The content and scheduled time of these breakout sessions are subject to change.