Law Enforcement Track

To view PPTicon-web  PowerPoint presentations click here.

To learn more about individual breakout sessions click on the title name (updated 3-25-16):

Tuesday – Investigations Focus
Using Advanced Analytics to Identify Drug-Seeking Behavior, Identity Fraud and Hospital-Based Drug Diversion
State and Federal Responses by Law Enforcement Officials
Investigating and Prosecuting Homicide by a Prescribing Doctor

Wednesday – Community Policing Focus
Drug-Related Deaths: Investigation, Prosecution and Review Strategies
Children Impacted by Drug Abuse and Violence
Drug Court Models

Overview
There were 1.5 million arrests for drug abuse violations in 2014 — more than any other category of crime — according in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program. Law enforcement officials are developing new approaches to traditional and community policing in response to greater possession and trafficking activities, as well as drug-related homicides. From the frontline of the opiate epidemic, law enforcement officials play a critical role in prevention, and their community policing efforts will be discussed. On March 29, presentations in the Law Enforcement Track will focus on investigating and prosecuting crimes related to Rx drug abuse and heroin, with topics including case studies of homicides by prescribing doctors, new approaches by national opioid initiatives, and using advanced analytics to identify drug-seeking behavior and identity fraud. On March 30, the track will feature community policing topics, including drug-endangered children, overdose fatality review teams and Drug Court models.
Using Advanced Analytics to Identify Drug-Seeking Behavior, Identity Fraud and Hospital-Based Drug Diversion
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 11:15 am to 12:30 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Mark Horowitz, RPh
Fraud Control, National Compliance Office, Kaiser Permanente
 
Jay Loden, CHC
Assistant Director of Information Analytics and Compliance Technology “iACT,” Kaiser Permanente
 
Tamara Neiman, MA
Director, National Special Investigations Unit, Kaiser Permanente
Moderator Michelle C. Landers, JD
Executive Vice President & General Counsel, Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description This session will give attendees a rare glimpse inside the fraud control, special investigations and information analytics units of a large managed care organization. Representatives of Kaiser Permanente will explain the company’s advanced efforts in the areas of drug-seeking behavior and identity fraud related to drug seeking. As payer and provider, they will share their analytics related to opioid abuse, investigative techniques (including the use of social media) and findings and outcomes of the many cases pursued. They will review a few cases in depth, taking the audience from discovery to adjudication of each case. They also will show how the medical group within Kaiser is using the data to improve patient care and safety.
Learning Objectives 1. Describe a large managed care organization’s advanced analytics and investigative techniques to identify drug-seeking behavior and identity fraud.
2. Analyze several cases of drug-seeking behavior and identify fraud from discovery to adjudication.
3. Explain how one managed care organization’s medical group uses analytics to improve patient care and safety.
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State and Federal Responses by Law Enforcement Officials
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 4:15 pm to 5:30 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Honorable Andy Beshear, JD
Attorney General, Commonwealth of Kentucky
 
M.J. Menendez, JD
OCDETF Heroin/Opioid Initiative Coordinator, Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force
 
Bruce G. Ohr, JD
Associate Deputy Attorney General, United States Department of Justice
Moderator Sarah T. Melton, PharmD
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University
Session Description This session showcases efforts by state and federal law enforcement officials to combat the nation’s Rx drug and heroin epidemics. A state attorney general will present from the perspective of a state’s chief law enforcement officer and legal advisor. Innovative approaches and best practices will be identified for consideration by other states.

From the federal level, the Department of Justice’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF) will present its National Heroin Initiative to address the dramatic increase in heroin and opioid addiction, overdoses and deaths. The initiative provides OCDETF’s field components – United States Attorney’s Office and field offices of the DEA, FBI, HSI, ATF and other federal law enforcement partners – with funding to develop and support creative strategies and initiatives to identify and exploit the vulnerabilities of criminal organizations most responsible for the trafficking of illegal opioids and heroin. Announced in December 2014, the initiative has proved hugely popular among the OCDETF field components. Presenters will explain the program and highlight specific projects.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify innovations and best practices from a state attorney
general.
2. Describe the OCDETF’s national initiative to address heroin and
opioid addiction, overdoses and deaths.
3. Outline creative strategies and initiatives to identify and exploit
the vulnerabilities of criminal organizations most responsible for the
trafficking of illegal opioids and heroin.
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Investigating and Prosecuting Homicide by a Prescribing Doctor
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Peter Kougasian, JD
Counsel to the Special Narcotics Prosecutor, City of New York
 
John Niedermann, JD
Deputy District Attorney, Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office
 
Ryan Sakacs, JD
Chief, Prescription Drug Investigation Unit, Office of the Special Narcotics Prosecutor, City of New York
Moderator Jackie L. Steele, Jr., JD
Commonwealth Attorney, Kentucky 27th Judicial Circuit, and Vice Chairman, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description In the last decade, prosecutors have taken actions rarely seen before the nation’s Rx drug abuse epidemic: holding physicians criminally accountable for patients’ deaths. In this session, prosecutors will explain two such cases that resulted in convictions. In the 2014 New York case, a medical doctor, board certified in anesthesiology and pain management, was convicted of two counts of manslaughter and scores of other crimes in connection with his pain-management practice. In the 2015 Los Angeles case, a medical doctor was convicted of homicide in the overdose deaths of three patients — the nation’s first murder conviction related to prescribing drugs to patients.

For each case, the prosecutors will describe the investigation and trial. Topics will include:
• Complexities of obtaining and analyzing information about the doctor’s practice and presenting that data in a way that would be clear and compelling to a lay jury
• Ethical issues, including the timing of the arrest of the doctor and respecting the privacy of patients.
• Complexities of expert testimony presented by prosecution and defense.
• Legal defenses and how those defenses were overcome at trial.
• Sentencing considerations.
• Policy implications and lessons for the future.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe two criminal cases that resulted in convictions against prescribing doctors in the deaths of their patients.
2. Identify challenges and solutions to investigating homicide by a prescribing doctor.
3. Explain how to prepare for and prosecute a criminal trial against a prescribing doctor.
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Drug-Related Deaths: Investigation, Prosecution and Review Strategies
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 12:30 pm to 1:45 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Michael Baier
Overdose Prevention Director, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
 
Patricia Daugherty, JD
Assistant District Attorney, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office
 
Erin Haas, MPH
Overdose Prevention Local Programs Manager, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Behavioral Health Administration
Moderator Jackie L. Steele, Jr., JD
Commonwealth Attorney, Kentucky 27th Judicial Circuit, and Vice Chairman, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description Overdose deaths involving Rx drugs more than doubled from 2001 to 2013, and heroin-related overdose deaths increased by five-fold over the same periods, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. In response, law enforcement officials are developing new approaches to investigating, prosecuting and reviewing drug-related deaths. This session will describe examples from Wisconsin and Maryland.

In Wisconsin, Milwaukee County’s rate of drug intoxication deaths is nearly double the national average. Law enforcement responded to this epidemic by developing investigative and prosecutorial strategies designed to maximize the likelihood of a successful resolution. This presentation will equip attendees with tools to identify the source of the fatal drug, including how to “work up the chain” of distribution to target higher-level drug suppliers. Topics will include building prosecutable cases, death-scene investigation techniques, investigative court orders, cellular telephone records, interview techniques, toxicology, use of confidential informants and strategies for presenting these cases in court. Several case studies will demonstrate how to use these tools together successfully.

In response to the opioid abuse epidemic, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) works with local jurisdictions to implement Overdose Fatality Review (OFR), in which a diverse team of stakeholders apply lessons from overdose deaths that make recommendations for law, policies and programs. The OFR teams conduct confidential, in-depth case reviews of resident deaths to identify missed opportunities for prevention and better understand stakeholder interactions with high-risk individuals. DHMH supports local teams through the provision of decedent information and technical assistance on the case review process. OFR is operational in 15 of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions and is a core component of the local overdose prevention strategic planning process.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify strategies for investigating and prosecuting drug-related homicides.
2. Explain how multiple tools can be utilized to build prosecutable cases.
3. Describe how Overdose Fatality Review can make recommendations for law, policies and programs.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Children Impacted by Drug Abuse and Violence
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Deborah Augustine
Victim Witness Program Manager, Drug Enforcement Administration
 
Andrea Darr, RBA
Director, West Virginia Center for Children’s Justice, West Virginia State Police
 
Chad Napier
Prevention Coordinator for West Virginia and Virginia, Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area
Moderator Mary Colvin, CPA, MBA
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance, and Member, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description An estimated 2.1 million children in the U.S. lived with at least one parent who abused or was dependent on illicit drugs between 2002 and 2007, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). More than 60 percent of the children surveyed were exposed to violence within the past year either directly or indirectly, based on a 2009 U.S. Department of Justice study. Law enforcement officers see the faces behind these statistics every day. This session will provide tools to help officers help children.

One presentation will explore the national concerns related to children exposed to illicit and Rx drug abuse. The presenter will present an overview of current drug trends in relation to the risk, identification and response of a child’s exposure to illicit drug use, manufacturing, distribution and cultivation and the non-medical use of Rx drugs. The presenter will raise awareness of key issues, the importance of collaboration and essential tools to help safeguard the most vulnerable of victims — children. A goal of the presentation will be to prepare law enforcement officers to respond to drug endangered children.

The next presentation will focus on children exposed to trauma, who often experience academic, behavioral and social problems in the classroom. Presenters will identify innovative best practices to mitigate the negative effects of trauma exposure and highlight “Handle with Care” — a promising initiative between schools, law enforcement and treatment providers. Schools receive a “heads up” when a child has been identified at the scene of a traumatic event (e.g., meth lab explosion, domestic violence). Police are trained to identify the children present, find out where they go to school and send the school a confidential email or fax that simply says: “Handle Johnny with care.” Model “Handle With Care” programs promote safe and supportive homes, schools and communities.

Learning Objectives 1. Explain the national concern created by children exposed to abuse of illicit and Rx drugs.
2. Prepare law enforcement officers to respond to drug endangered children.
3. Identify best practice for mitigating the negative effects of children’s exposure to trauma.
4. Describe how the “Handle with Care” program can be used by law enforcement, schools and treatment providers to identify children who have been exposed to a traumatic event.
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Drug Court Models
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
CE certified GA POST | GA Bar
Presenters Jo Ann Ferdinand, JD
Acting Justice, New York State Supreme Court, Brooklyn Treatment Court
 
Vanessa Price
Chair, Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board, and Inspector (Retired), City of Oklahoma City Police Department,
Moderator Tom Handy
Retired Commonwealth Attorney, Kentucky 27th Judicial Circuit, and Chair, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description Those who work in the criminal justice system are painfully aware of the nation’s Rx drug abuse and heroin epidemic. Here are a few grim statistics compiled by the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP):
• 60 percent of individuals arrested for most types of crimes test positive for illicit drugs at arrest.
• After release from prison, 60 to 80 percent of drug abusers commit a new crime (typically a drug-driven crime) and approximately 95 return to drug abuse.
• Unless they are regularly supervised by a judge, 60 to 80 percent of addicted offenders drop out of treatment prematurely.

To break this cycle, law enforcement officers are looking for alternatives to incarceration so that people succeed in treatment rather than fail in prison. Drug Courts have proven effective solutions, with more than 2,700 Drug Courts operating in all 50 states and U.S. territories, according to NADCP. This session will explore the elements of successful Drug Court programs. Presenters will recommend best practices that attendees can pursue in their communities.

Learning Objectives 1. Explain the operation and benefits of Drug Court programs.
2. Discuss how to implement new and improve existing Drug Court programs.
3. Identify best practices among Drug Court programs.
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The content and scheduled time of these breakout sessions are subject to change.