PDMP Track

To view PPTicon-web  PowerPoint presentations click here.

To learn more about individual breakout sessions click on the title name (updated 3-25-16):

Tuesday
PDMPs as Prevention Tools
New Developments in PDMPs: California, Colorado and Minnesota
Risk Behaviors, Morbidity and Mortality
 
Wednesday
When Prescribers Use PDMP Data
New Developments in PDMPs: South Carolina, Wisconsin and Florida
Linking and Mapping PDMP Data

Overview
State prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are essential tools in responding to Rx drug abuse. A wide variety of stakeholders use PDMP data to reduce misuse, abuse and diversion of Rx drugs, reduce Rx drug overdoses, and improve patient care. The PDMP Track will feature innovations gleaned from national reviews of PDMP programs and the experiences of state PDMP operators. Topics will include features to include in a PDMP program, optimizing prescriber utilization of PDMP data, partnerships to disseminate data widely, and recommendations for using PDMP data to achieve a variety of goals, such as reducing morbidity, mapping areas with low or no treatment options, and identifying risky behaviors in patients, prescribers and pharmacists.
PDMPs as Prevention Tools
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 4:15 pm to 5:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ADA | ACPE | AAFP
Presenters Christopher Baumgartner
Drug Systems Director, Washington State Department of Health
 
Tina Farales
Department of Justice Administrator, Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, California Department of Justice
 
Peter Kreiner, PhD
Senior Scientist, Brandeis University
 
Neal D. Traven, PhD
Epidemiologist, Prescription Monitoring Program, Washington State Department of Health
Moderator John L. Eadie
Coordinator, Public Health and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Project, National HIDTA Assistance Center, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description A promising application of PDMP data is to support epidemiological studies and public health efforts to mitigate Rx drug abuse. This session will describe two examples, one featuring de-identified PDMP data and the other state-local partnerships.

The first presentation will discuss uses of de-identified PDMP data by state and county public health agencies to coordinate prevention and mitigation efforts. They will cover the use of “opioid heat maps” to target such efforts, the relationship of patterns of buprenorphine prescribing to areas of opioid abuse risk, and the challenges of using PDMP data for public health purposes, including de­identifying Rx data generally lacking unique positive identifiers, the importance of state adoption of uniform data de-identification methodology, and the use of data sharing agreements to ensure adherence to privacy rights.

Next, presenters will explain how the Washington State Department of Health’s Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) shares data with county partners to target their prevention strategies. The WA PMP partnered with an advisory workgroup of local health jurisdiction (LHJ) leaders to develop a framework for designing county/LHJ profiles of Rx opioid (and other controlled substance) usage to construct reports that address issues of significant value for guiding resource allocation and policy decisions at the county level. The presentation will share the process of putting this project together and the results.

Learning Objectives 1. Explain how state and county public health officials use de-identified PDMP data to coordinate opioid abuse prevention and mitigation efforts.
2. Identify challenges of using PDMP data for public health purposes.
3. Describe the Washington State model for providing PDMP data to local jurisdictions to inform their resource allocation and policy decisions.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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New Developments in PDMPs: California, Colorado and Minnesota
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | ADA | AAFP
Presenters Artin Armagan, PhD
Manager, Advanced Analytics Lab, SAS Institute
 
Barbara A. Carter
PMP Manager, Minnesota Board of Pharmacy
 
Tina Farales
Department of Justice Administrator, Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, California Department of Justice
 
Mark R. O’Neill, RPh
Program Manager, Colorado Prescription Drug Monitoring Program
Moderator John L. Eadie
Coordinator, Public Health and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Project, National HIDTA Assistance Center, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description Now that PDMPs are widely implemented, program administrators, public health professionals and elected officials are turning attention toward strategies to enhance these programs. This session will describe new approaches in three states.

The first presentation will feature strategies in Colorado and Minnesota to optimize PDMPs as healthcare tools. States have identified three primary healthcare goals for PDMPs: (1) help improve patient care; (2) help reduce misuse, abuse and diversion of Rx drugs; and (3) help reduce Rx drug overdoses. Research indicates that use of PMDP data can result in more appropriate prescribing behavior and confirm a health care professional’s suspicion of possible Rx drug abuse or diversion. State officials are implementing new measures to make PDMP data more reliable and easier to access and interpret for patient care decisions. Presenters will describe innovative enhancements to improve data integrity and streamline retrieval and viewing of PDMP searches and reports.

Next, presenters will describe California’s upgraded PDMP, known as CURES 2.0, which began roll out in July 2015. Considered to be the nation’s most advanced PDMP, it features an innovative synergy of an advanced analytics engine coupled with the latest technology application, providing a robust Rx information system to clinicians, oversight agencies and law enforcement. It provides sizeable patient activity reports within seconds, re-computing the terabyte-size database daily and creating fresh patient medication safety alerts for clinicians. It offers peer-to-peer messaging capability, patient treatment exclusivity compacts, systematic de-identification of data set production, and statistical trend reports and graphics for public consumption. Presenters will provide insights into the tremendous possibilities for all PDMPs of advanced analytics combined with a state-of-the-art application.

Learning Objectives 1. Express the value of PDMPs as healthcare tools.
2. Describe PDMP enhancements that improve data integrity and streamline retrieval and viewing of PDMP searches and reports.
3. Identify the features and benefits of California’s upgraded PDMP, CURES 2.0.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Risk Behaviors, Morbidity and Mortality
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 7:15 pm to 8:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ADA | ACPE | AAFP
Presenters Peter Kreiner, PhD
Senior Scientist, Brandeis University
 
Christopher Ringwalt, DrPH, MSW
Senior Scientist, Injury Prevention Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 
Sharon Schiro, PhD
Associate Professor/Data Scientist, Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
Moderator John J. Dreyzehner, MD, MPH, FACOEM
Commissioner, Tennessee Department of Health, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description In this session, attendees will learn how prescriber risk behaviors are indicated by the Prescription Behavior Surveillance System — a longitudinal, multi-state database of de-identified PDMP data, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The presenter will report on a validation study of the prescriber risk behavior indicators using data from Maine, comparing prescribers who ranked highest on each of 11 indicators with prescribers against whom the state Medical Board took action during 2010 -2014. It assessed the association of the top tiers of prescribers for each indicator with having had a board action taken, with an action taken for inappropriate prescribing and with action severity. Discussion will include study findings, limitations and implications for prevention of Rx drug misuse and abuse.

Attendees also will explore how North Carolina utilizes its PDMP to reduce morbidity and mortality related to Rx drug abuse by means of partnerships with multiple agencies — academic institutions, state agencies, the state’s Medical Board and a large healthcare system. Presenters will describe several projects underway, including (1) development of algorithms utilizing PDMP and death certificate data to identify prescribers with uncustomary prescribing practices; (2) integration of the PDMP in to the electronic medical record system of a large health care system, and (3) utilization of a large health care system’s inpatient and outpatient electronic Rx records and PDMP records to provide immediate feedback to prescribers on potentially high-risk patients. They will share methodologies, techniques for navigating policy and technical hurdles, and lessons learned.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify indicators of risk behaviors by prescribers.
2. Demonstrate the prescriber risk behavior indicators used by the nation’s Prescriber Behavior Surveillance System.
3. Explain how North Carolina shares its PDMP data with multiple agencies to reduce morbidity and mortality related to Rx drug abuse.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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When Prescribers Use PDMP Data
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 11:15 am to 12:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ADA | ACPE | AAFP
Presenters John L. Eadie
Coordinator, Public Health and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Project, National HIDTA Assistance Center, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
 
Sara Hallvik, MPH
Healthcare Analyst Manager, Acumentra Health
 
Christi Hildebran, LMSW, CADC III
Research Manager, Acumentra Health
 
Cynthia Reilly
Director, Prescription Drug Abuse Project, The Pew Charitable Trusts
Moderator Anne L. Burns, RPh
Vice President, Professional Affairs, American Pharmacists Association, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description There is evidence that PDMPs are effective tools for curbing Rx drug abuse, but these databases remain underutilized by prescribers. In this session, one research team will identify strategies to optimize prescriber utilization of PDMP data, and the other will compare prescribing patterns and patient outcomes when prescribers use PDMP data.

Presenters will compare opioid prescribing patterns before and after provider registration for the Oregon PDMP, and compare those results to propensity ¬score matched providers who did not register to use the PDMP. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, this research aims to identify how provider use of the PDMP affects prescribing behaviors as measured by a well-defined set of metrics, and how patient outcomes, as measured by opioid use trajectories and opioid-related death and hospitalization, are associated with both prescriber behavior and use of the PDMP. Topics will include engaging PDMP administrators, prescriber community and stakeholders in a discussion about optimizing PDMP use, potential for revision of prescribing guidelines, provider training, and patient education to increase patient safety.

The Pew Charitable Trusts and PDMP Center of Excellence at Brandeis University collaborated to produce a report outlining evidence-based practices that increase prescriber utilization of PDMPs, the impact of these practices on database administration, and potential barriers to implementation and strategies for addressing those barriers. Presenters will explore evidence surrounding prescriber mandates, unsolicited reporting and delegation. Researchers involved with the project will discuss research findings.

Learning Objectives 1. Explain the benefits when prescribers use PDMP data.
2. Outline evidence-based practices that increase prescriber utilization of PDMPs.
3. Compare opioid prescribing patterns before and after provider registration with the Oregon PDMP.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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New Developments in PDMPs: South Carolina, Wisconsin and Florida
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | AAFP
Presenters Chris Delcher, PhD
Assistant Professor, University of Florida
 
Christie Frick, RPh
Director, Prescription Monitoring Program, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
 
Bruce Goldberger, PhD
Chief, Division of Forensic Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine
 
Chad Zadrazil, JD
Managing Director, Wisconsin Controlled Substances Board and PDMP Program, Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services
Moderator Karen H. Perry
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Narcotics Overdose Prevention and Education Task Force, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description States continually improve their PDMPs to respond more effectively to Rx drug abuse. In this session, three states will report on developments in their PDMP programs.

To begin, presenters will consider how to increase practitioners’ use of PDMP data through integration into electronic health IT systems, featuring initiatives by South Carolina and Wisconsin to provide prescribers and dispensers easier access to PDMP data at the point-of-care. They will present lessons learned about challenges and factors impacting integration that will help other states streamline their own integration efforts. Also, an update will be given on development, which began in September 2015, of Wisconsin’s next-generation PDMP, with emphasis on stakeholder involvement in the process and unique layout and features of the system.

Next, presenters will discuss the challenges and opportunities of Florida’s nascent drug surveillance systems. Florida’s role in the Rx drug epidemic has been highly publicized, and this presentation will dispel and confirm components of that attention. Presenters will describe the state’s robust, centralized medical examiner system and PDMP, current trends in licit and illicit drug deaths, data available from Florida’s PDMP (as of December 2015), and efforts to integrate surveillance systems to gain new insights. Topics will include trends for deaths from heroin and fentanyl, oxycodone, alprazolam and four-year prescribing trends for these drugs using the epidemiologic framework of person, place and time. State, regional and national implications will be discussed.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe how two states improved integration of PDMP data into electronic health IT systems.
2. Identify challenges states may face when ingegrating PDMP data into electronic health IT systems.
3. Explain the operation and findings of Florida’s nascent drug surveillance systems.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Linking and Mapping PDMP Data
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | APA | AAFP
Presenters Christopher Baumgartner
Drug Systems Director, Washington State Department of Health
 
Jason Hoppe, DO
Emergency Physician and Medical Toxiocologist, University of Colorado and Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center
 
Gillian Leichtling
Senior Research Associate, Acumentra Health
 
Benjamin Sun, MD, MS
Emergency Medicine Physician, Oregon Health & Science University
Moderator Christopher M. Jones, PharmD, MPH
Director, Division of Science Policy, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description PDMP data is shedding new light on Rx drug abuse, and combining it with other data paints a fuller picture. This session will demonstrate two examples.

Most published studies utilizing PDMP data have been epidemiological, using statewide data to focus on risk factors for adverse outcomes and defining patterns of high-risk opioid use. Research linking PDMP data to clinical encounters to evaluate prescribing decisions and patient related outcomes is the next logical step to fully leverage PDMP data. The presenters — who are practicing emergency physician researchers — will discuss linking PDMP data to clinical data, specifically its benefits, mechanisms for doing so, barriers to success, and opportunities to improve access and facilitate research.

Next, presenters will describe a Washington State project, funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, to develop a GIS mapping tool that integrates PDMP data with other existing datasets and displays community-level results. It is used to identify medication-assisted treatment (MAT) “service deserts” — areas of high potential treatment need and low availability of MAT. Other mapped data include opioid treatment program services, opioid overdose deaths and hospitalizations, PDMP registration rates, and naloxone distribution and safe Rx disposal sites. Topics will include presentation of data for state and local stakeholders, as well as mapping as an aid in targeting treatment expansion and overdose prevention efforts.

Learning Objectives 1. Explain the benefits, challenges and opportunities of linking PDMP data to clinical data.
2. Identify the benefits of mapping data to target treatment expansion and overdose prevention efforts.
3. Describe a state GIS mapping tool that integrates PDMP data with existing databases and displays community-level results.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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The content and scheduled time of these breakout sessions are subject to change.