Prevention Track

To view PPTicon-web  PowerPoint presentations click here.

To learn more about individual breakout sessions click on the title name (updated 3-25-16):

Tuesday
Preventing Hepatitis C and HIV Outbreaks
Multi-Media Prevention
Preventing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)
 
Wednesday
Youth Prevention Programs
Youth, Performance-Enhancing Drugs and ADHD Medication
Workplace Issues and Strategies

Overview
The cost of illicit drug use totaled more than $193 billion in a 2011 report by the National Drug Intelligence Center, which included direct and indirect crime, health, and productivity costs. In contrast, every $1 invested in prevention can save $2 to $20, according to the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA). The Prevention Track will consider how to prevent Rx drug and heroin abuse, as well as their associated harms, such as overdose deaths, HIV and Hepatitis C infection, and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Presentations will include the latest data/trends related to prevention efforts, best practices for using digital media as a prevention tool, and effective strategies targeting youth, expectant mothers and the workplace.
Preventing Hepatitis C and HIV Outbreaks
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 4:15 pm to 5:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ADA | ACPE | APA | NASW | NAADAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP
Presenters Jerome Adams, MD, MPH
State Health Commissioner, Indiana State Department of Health
 
Joan Duwve, MD, MPH
Chief Medical Officer, Indiana State Department of Health
 
Scott Proescholdbell, MPH
Epidemiologist, Injury and Violence Prevention Branch, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
 
Nidhi Sachdeva, MPH
Injury Prevention Consultant, Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
Moderator Jinhee J. Lee, PharmD
Public Health Advisor, Division of Pharmocologic Therapies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description In March 2015, Indiana declared a public health emergency due to an outbreak of HIV infections, which was traced to an intravenous use of a Rx painkiller in a rural community. The highly publicized case drew national attention to the risks related to injection drug use (IDU). Already, the nation’s public health officials were grappling with an uptick in reported cases of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, which increased 2.5-fold from 2010 to 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This session will examine Indiana’s HIV outbreak and response, as well as North Carolina’s efforts to reduce IDU and associated infectious disease transmission.

Indiana public health officials will describe how they identified and responded to a community outbreak of HIV infection, linked to IDU of oxymorphone. In January 2015, the Indiana State Department of Health began investigating an outbreak of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID) traced to a rural community in southeastern Indiana. This investigation included over 500 PWID, 181 of whom have been diagnosed with HlV infection to date, in a community of 4,200 people. Presenters will outline the ongoing response from the national, state and local level, including successes and challenges. They will share the lessons they learned in order to assist other states with prevention and surveillance efforts in localized communities of PWID.

North Carolina public health officials will explain their collaboration to reduce IDU and associated infectious disease transmission. In North Carolina, the reported cases of acute HCV infections increased three-fold from 2010 to 2014; medication and drug overdose deaths have increased by more than 300 percent since 1999; and heroin deaths have increased by 500 percent since 2010. With overlapping at-risk populations, the convergence of IDU, HCV and HIV infections, and overdose, can be considered a syndemic. In response, the state’s Injury Prevention and Communicable Disease Branches are coordinating efforts to engage stakeholders, identify vulnerable populations and consider public health interventions. Resulting best practices can be used during similar public health responses in the future.

Learning Objectives 1. Inform attendees of the risks of infectious disease outbreaks related to injection drug use.
2. Identify lessons learned by Indiana public health officials during their investigation and response to a 2015 outbreak of HIV infections linked to injection drug use.
3. Describe North Carolina’s collaboration between injury and infectious disease programs to reduce injection drug associated harms.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Multi-Media Prevention
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | ADA | APA | NASW | NAADAC | NCHES | NBCC | AAFP
Presenters Rosemary Bretthauer-Mueller
Digital Communication and Marketing Lead, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 
Jan Cairnes, CPP
Director of Prevention Services, Hanley Center Foundation
 
Peter DeBenedittis, PhD
President, Media Literacy for Prevention
 
LaShaundra Cordier Scott, MPH, CHES
Health Communications Team Lead, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Moderator Mary Colvin, CPA, MBA
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance, and Member, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description This session will consider multi-media approaches to preventing Rx drug and heroin abuse and overdose. Topics will include how to have a digital conversation with those seeking health information, as well as media literacy education as part of a prevention program that is based on challenging expectancies instead of promoting risk/protective factors.

To support its Rx drug overdose (PDO) prevention programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched a website in 2014 and a social media activity — #RXProblem — during the 2015 National Rx Drug Abuse Summit. #RxProblem generated 3,000 tweets and resulted in 27.9 million impressions, supported by additional PDO messages across a variety of integrated digital platforms. Focusing on cross-promotion between digital platforms, accessibility on multiple devices, and image- and audience- based messages, these efforts significantly increased dissemination and audience engagement. CDC presenters will discuss delivering messages digitally, reinforced by traditional communications. They will cover assessing digital metrics to gauge how communication channels and products affect audience engagement and information-seeking behavior. These best practices can be used to expand message reach, drive theory-based digital planning for health communications and identify key opportunities to leverage digital platforms to increase awareness around PDO prevention.

In today’s school environments, multi-session prevention programs are becoming more difficult to implement. Presenters will explain how the Expectancy Challenge Theory can be used to provide effective, single-session adolescent prevention programs. Expectancy Challenge programming has received a Tier 1 rating by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and has been shown to reduce high-risk behaviors in a single session, yet it does not address risk/protective factors. Presenters will lead an expectancy challenge so attendees can experience firsthand application of this paradigm. Presenters will compare and contrast the risk/protective factor approach to prevention and the Expectancy Challenge approach, which mixes media literacy with brain science. They will describe how media literacy education is used in prevention efforts across multiple Florida counties, as well as how schools are welcoming Expectancy Challenge programs.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe the CDC’s digital Rx drug overdose prevention campaign.
2. Identify best practices for delivering prevention messages digitally.
3. Compare and contrast Expectancy Challenge Theory and risk/protective factors as the basis for adolescent prevention programs.
4. Explain how some Florida schools are using media literacy education in single-session prevention programs based on Expectancy Challenge Theory.
5. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Preventing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | 7:15 pm to 8:30 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | ACPE | NASW | NCHES | AAFP
Presenters Deborah Huddleston
Media Relations and Project Director, Metro (Knoxville) Drug Coalition
 
Sheri Lawal, MPH, CHES
Senior Associate, The Pew Charitable Trusts
 
Karen Pershing, MPH, CPS II
Executive Director, Metro (Knoxville) Drug Coalition
 
Michael Warren, MD, MPH
Assistant Commissioner, Tennessee Department of Health
Moderator Carla S. Saunders, NNP-BC
Advance Practice Coordinator, Pediatrix Medical Group, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description The incidence of NAS increased three-fold nationally from 2000 to 2010, with Tennessee’s rate rising three times faster than the national rate. In 2014, approximately 1,000 Tennessee newborns were diagnosed with NAS, which is a group of problems that occur in a newborn who was exposed to addictive opiate drugs while in the mother’s womb. In response, Tennessee has developed a broad array of NAS prevention strategies. Based on that experience, this session will identify primary prevention opportunities for state and local health departments and will explain one program in detail.

In 2013, the Tennessee Department of Health made NAS a reportable condition, allowing for real-time collection of data on the incidence of NAS and the prenatal exposure sources. This data is informing numerous primary prevention efforts, including innovative partnerships between local health departments and jails. Health department staff provide health education to incarcerated women of childbearing age, including information on reproductive health. Interested participants can request care at a local health department, including placement of a voluntary, reversible long-acting contraceptive. Presenters will discuss collecting data on NAS and using this data to inform primary prevention projects in areas most impacted by opioid abuse.

The East Tennessee NAS Task Force and other East Tennessee community partners implemented Born Drug-Free Tennessee (BDFTN) with initial funding from the Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (AHIDTA). Inspired by a successful campaign from Florida, BDFTN raises awareness about babies being born exposed to Rx and other drugs. The multi-disciplinary program educates expectant mothers about the importance of discussing Rx and other drug use with their doctors; features a local and national media campaign; trains medical professionals in Screening, Brief Interventions and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT); and distributes materials on a multifaceted level for the community. Presenters will explain BDFTN with the goal of helping other communities combat NAS.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe how Tennessee is collecting NAS data and using it to inform primary prevention projects.
2. Identify NAS primary prevention opportunities for state and local health departments.
3. Explain the Born Drug-Free Tennessee program for raising awareness of NAS and educating expectant mothers.
4. Provide accurate and appropriate counsel as part of the treatment team.
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Youth Prevention Programs
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 11:15 am to 12:30 pm
CE certified APA | NASW | NADAAC | NCHES | NBCC | GA POST
Presenters Kristi Justice, MA
Executive Director, Kanawha Communities That Care
 
Chad Napier
Prevention Coordinator for West Virginia and Virginia, Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area
 
Justin Phillips, MA
President and Founder, Overdose Lifeline, Inc.
 
Kourtnaye Sturgeon
Board Member and Education Committee Chair, Overdose Lifeline, Inc.
Moderator Karen H. Perry
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Narcotics Overdose Prevention and Education Task Force, and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description Youths who were exposed to prevention messages — either at school or outside of school — were generally less likely to be substance users than their counterparts who were not exposed to prevention messages, according to the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. To give attendees more prevention tools, this session will feature one program targeted to families and one program for classrooms and public settings.

The Give Me a Reason program distributes free, non-invasive drug-testing kits that are intended to start a dialogue between parents and children on the use of drugs and to help youth avoid peer pressure. The hope is that the having the option to perform a voluntary test at home will promote a drug-free lifestyle, without ever actually using the kit. The kit includes resources in the event of a positive test. Presenters will describe Charleston’s experience with this prevention program, which was created by Appalachia High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (AHIDTA). Topics will include implementation of the pilot project through a community-based organization and the partnership with AHIDTA.

This Is (Not) about Drugs — launched in 2015 by Overdose-Lifeline, Inc. — is a prevention education program that informs students of the risks of opioids and heroin use and provides alternatives to using drugs and alcohol in dealing with the issues, stresses and pressures facing today’s youth. The lessons include: drug and alcohol use can lead to heroin use, addiction, overdose and death; impacts of heroin, drugs and alcohol on the user, family and friends; how to ask for help with drugs and addiction; and current informational and assistance resources. This will be a “train-the-trainer” presentation for the purpose of facilitation in classrooms and public settings.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe the Give Me a Reason voluntary drug-testing program as a prevention tool for parents.
2. Explain how to implement the Give Me a Reason prevention program in a community.
3. Explain how to implement the prevention program called This Is (Not) about Drugs.
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Youth, Performance-Enhancing Drugs and ADHD Medication
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
CE certified AMA | ANCC | APA | NASW | NCHES | NBCC | NADAAC | AAFP
Presenters David Arnold, BSW
Director, Alcohol Abuse Prevention Initiatives, NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education
 
Jan Cairnes, CPP
Director of Prevention Services, Hanley Center Foundation
 
Ryan Wertepny
Prevention Coordinator, Hanley Center Foundation
Moderator Nancy Hale, MA
President and CEO, Operation UNITE
Session Description Misuse of performance-enhancing drugs and ADHD medication is on the rise among young people. This session will help attendees integrate these drugs of choice into their prevention programs.

Girls want to be thin and toned, and boys want a “six-pack,” and both believe steroids can be the answer. In a confidential 2013 survey of 3,705 high school students, by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 11 percent reported using synthetic human growth hormone (HGH) at least once — up from about 5 percent in the four preceding annual surveys. Teen use of steroids increased from 5 percent to 7 percent over the same period, the survey found. This presentation — entitled “Kids, Drugs and Sports” — will explain why steroids work and how to help adolescents achieve their goals without the need for performance-enhancing drugs.

The number of emergency department visits involving non-medical use of ADHD medications nearly tripled from 5,212 in 2005 to 15,585 in 2010, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). A representative of the Coalition to Prevent ADHD Medication Misuse (CPAMM) will give insights into ADHD medication misuse, abuse and diversion among college students, and share CPAMM plans to take action on the issue. Topics will include existing research regarding ADHD medication misuse among college students, insights from CPAMM’s National Summit, research/focus groups planned by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and potential opportunities for collaboration.

Learning Objectives 1. Describe the trends in misuse of performance-enhancing drugs and ADHD medication among young people.
2. Identify strategies for adolescents to achieve their goals without performance-enhancing drugs.
3. Outline plans for addressing ADHD misuse, abuse and diversion among college students.
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Workplace Issues and Strategies
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 | 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
CE certified APA
Presenters Laurie Cluff, PhD
Workplace Health and Safety Research Psychologist, RTI International
 
Jennifer Fan, PharmD, JD
Pharmacy Advisor, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
 
Scott Novak, PhD
Senior Developmental Epidemiologist, RTI International
Moderator J. Kevin Massey, MS
Business and Program Development Specialist, Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., and Member, Rx & Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description In a 2011 report, the National Drug Intelligence Center calculated that illicit drug use cost America $120 billion in lost productivity. Most people overdosing on Rx drugs are employed. This session will address the challenges Rx drug abuse presents in the workplace and the implications for employers and communities. It also will review principles underlying successful workplace interventions to prevent and intervene early in substance use disorders. Presenters will describe how SAMHSA’s Preventing Prescription Abuse in the Workplace (PAW) technical assistance center applied those principles to develop collaborative workplace response strategies and programs. Topics covered will include modifying drug-free workplace programs and policies to account for Rx misuse, return to work following misuse, recent SAMHSA regulatory actions about workplace testing for Rx drugs, and the array of tools SAMHSA has put in place to help workplaces address misuse. Those tools include a fact sheet series for employees, a wellness app embedded with a Rx drug problem self-assessment, a workplace prevention toolkit, a calculator estimating costs to the employer, and a listserv that weekly summarizes news and research about Rx misuse, heroin crossover and marijuana abuse.
Learning Objectives 1. Outline the challenges Rx drug abuse poses in the workplace.
2. Identify principles underlying workplace strategies to prevent and intervene early in substance use disorders.
3. Describe the workplace prevention and response programs and tools available through the SAMHSA Prevention Prescription Abuse in the Workplace technical assistance center.
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The content and scheduled time of these breakout sessions are subject to change.