Roundtables

To view Summaries of the discussion click here.

To learn more about individual Thought-Leader Roundtable sessions click on the title name (updated 3-24-16):

First Round
Abuse-Deterrent Opioids: Is Legislation Necessary?
Engaging Healthcare Providers for Lifelong Learning about Heroin and Rx Drug Abuse
Prevention and the Transition to Heroin: Engaging the Prevention Community
Abuse of Rx Drugs on College Campuses

Second Round
Beyond the ‘Thin Blue Line’
Impacting Youth: Recovery High Schools
Identifying and Overcoming Barriers to Second-Chance Opportunities
What Makes for Effective PDMP Programs?

Overview
Thought-Leader Roundtables are designed to go in-depth on challenges impacting Rx drug abuse and Heroin use. These sessions are designed around peer learning and actively encourage participation from each attendee. Facilitators are available to guide the discussion, but the real learning comes from the ideas generated by attendees.
Abuse-Deterrent Opioids: Is Legislation Necessary?
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 9:00 am – 10:15 am
Facilitator Mary Colvin, CPA, MBA
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance, and Member, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description Prescription opioid analgesics are an important component of modern pain management, but abuse has created a growing public health problem. Abuse-deterrent formulations can meaningfully reduce Rx drug abuse, but in many cases access is limited or even non-existent. Some healthcare plans do not cover abuse-deterrent opioids, or have imposed barriers to access. What are the key principles of effective abuse-deterrent opioids policy and is legislation necessary to ensure adequate access? How do we address this problem while ensuring that patients in pain have appropriate access to opioid analgesics? This roundtable will examine these issues.
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Engaging Healthcare Providers for Lifelong Learning about Heroin and Rx Drug Abuse
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 9:00 am – 10:15 am
Facilitator Sarah T. Melton, PhD
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Gatton College of Pharmacy, East Tennessee State University
Session Description According to the Centers for Disease Control, prescribers contribute to opioid abuse and overdose because of a lack of education and awareness about appropriate opioid prescribing practices. Opioid analgesics in the United States are primarily prescribed by primary care or internal medicine physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants and most have little training in pain management or addiction. Pharmacists on the front line dispensing controlled substances also lack education about appropriate prescribing of controlled substances and how to refer patients to appropriate resources when a substance use disorder is identified. Robust education is needed in all curricula of healthcare provider schools and residency programs that address appropriate management of chronic pain syndromes and the disease of addiction. In addition, robust continuing education programming that lends itself to lifelong learning and reinforcement of appropriate prescribing and monitoring of patients is needed. This session will discuss novel and practical ways to engage healthcare providers and provide needed education at all levels of clinical practice.
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Prevention and the Transition to Heroin: Engaging the Prevention Community
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 9:00 am – 10:15 am
Facilitator Jackie L. Steele, Jr., JD
Commonwealth Attorney, Kentucky 27th Judicial Circuit, and Vice Chairman, Operation UNITE Board of Directors
Session Description The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that heroin use more than doubled among young adults (ages 18-25) in the past decade. The CDC further reports that 45 percent of people who used heroin were also addicted to some type of Rx opioid painkiller. But, most alarming, is that, Rx opioid-related deaths (18,893 deaths) increased 16 percent, and heroin-related death rates (10,574 deaths) increased 28 percent, from 2013 to 2014. How prepared are you for this dual-threat epidemic? What steps can be taken to prevent heroin-related problems? This roundtable will explore these questions and share information about successful strategies being implemented across the nation.
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Abuse of Rx Drugs on College Campuses
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 9:00 am – 10:15 am
Facilitator Karen H. Perry
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Narcotics Overdose Prevention and Education Task Force, Member, National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit Advisory Board
Session Description A growing number of college-age students today are abusing Rx medicines. According to a 2014 national survey by the Partnership for Drug-free Kids, one in six young adults has abused an Rx stimulant at least once in their lifetime. Stimulants prescribed for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are most likely to be abused. Classified as “study drugs,” student self-medicating is practically the norm. How common is drug use at colleges and universities? What drives college students to experiment with drugs? This roundtable will explore these questions, share information about effective prevention strategies being used on campus to reduce drug abuse, and offer suggestions about how these strategies can be followed up by parents and educators.
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Beyond the ‘Thin Blue Line’
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Facilitator Daren L. Atkins
Resident Agent in Charge, London Resident Office, United States Drug Enforcement Administration
Session Description Though definitions may vary, the “Thin Blue Line” often refers to the solidarity of law enforcement and the “line,” or barrier, afforded by police that separates society from good and evil. This strong brotherhood concept supports the traditional role of law enforcement professionals as protecting and serving the public. The session is formatted as a roundtable discussion to exchange ideas and challenge one another to “think outside the box” regarding the expansion of traditional roles of law enforcement in better serving our communities.
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Impacting Youth: Recovery High Schools
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Facilitator Kristen K. Harper, MEd, LCDC
Executive Director, Association of Recovery Schools
Session Description The Association of Recovery Schools (ARS) is devoted to the creation, maintenance and sustainability of recovery high schools across the country. Every other year, ARS takes an in-depth look at the state of recovery for adolescents in the United States. The 2016 Biennial Report has been completed and will be presented by Executive Director, Kristen Harper, during this roundtable discussion. Come and learn with a recovery high school, how to start one and what it takes to be accredited by ARS.

Download a copy of the 52-page report  Pdf icon

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Identifying and Overcoming Barriers to Second-Chance Opportunities
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Facilitator Tina Messer, MA
Manager, Specialty Courts, Kentucky Administrative Office of the Courts
Session Description When a person has completed treatment or is released from jail, their recovery journey has just begun. But they will face obstacles. This roundtable will explore these barriers and opportunities for these individuals to make the most of their second-chance. Discussion will include identifying specific problems faced by job-seekers if they disclose that they have been in treatment or are in recovery, or if they have a black cloud hanging over them from their past criminal history. What have you, your agency or your community done to help overcome such barriers and to provide for, or allow, second chances?
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What Makes for Effective PDMP Programs?
Thursday, March 30, 2016, 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Facilitator John L. Eadie
Coordinator, Public Health and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Project, National Emerging Threat Initiative, National HIDTA Assistance Center, and Member, Rx and Heroin Summit National Advisory Board
Session Description One of the most valuable tools in addressing misuse, abuse and diversion of Rx drugs has been prescription drug monitoring programs. Yet PDMPs are still underutilized despite evidence that they not only decrease diversion and doctor shopping but also positively impact prescribing habits. This roundtable will look at what states have effective PDMP programs and what makes them effective. Discussion will also be held as to what obstacles exist for the increased use of PDMPs and strategies for overcoming those obstacles.
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The content and time of these Thought-Leader Roundtable sessions are subject to change.